Swindon once again named one of the best places to sell a property

By Anita Jaynes on 25 September, 2021

Swindon has been named one of the best places in England and Wales to sell a property.

The best and worst places to sell lists, compiled by Quick Move Now and home.co.uk, draw on time on market data from hundreds of thousands of online property listings. This is the sixth time Swindon has appeared in the ‘top ten’.

Properties in Bolton and Newport typically spend just 56 days on the market. Mayfair in London, at the other end of the scale, is the worst place to sell a property with homes typically staying on the market for 261 days.

Best places to sell a property:

LocationMedian number of days on marketMedian price
Bolton56£165,000
Newport56£210,000
Hull58£140,000
Stoke On Trent58£124,950
Chatham58£240,000
Nottingham59£225,000
Bristol59£321,500
Swindon59£220,000
Sutton61£315,000
Rochester61£250,000

Worst places to sell a property:

LocationMedian number of days on marketMedian price
Mayfair261£2,282,000
Strand253£1,250,000
Charing Cross249£1,495,000
Soho235.5£1,970,000
Marylebone209£1,662,500
Knightsbridge207£1,999,000
Westminster204£1,150,000
Holborn203£1,100,000
Belgravia195£1,420,000
Regents Park182£1,595,000

The median time on market for the whole of England and Wales is currently 77 days.

Danny Luke, Quick Move Now’s managing director, commented: “It’s no surprise that London dominates the list of areas with the longest typical time on market; the city’s property market woes have been well documented over the last 18 months. However, it is worth noting that even the area with the longest typical time on market – Mayfair – has seen the benefits of a nationwide uplift in the market over the last six months. In March of this year, Mayfair properties typically spent 272 days on the market. The current typical time on market has dropped to 261 days.

“Elsewhere, we continue to see the effects of strong demand and limited supply. The current typical time on market across the whole of England and Wales is the lowest August figure since 2007. However, time on market has increased slightly in some areas since the phased ending of the stamp duty holiday, which was to be expected. In March of this year, Rochester was in ‘top spot’ with a typical time on market of just 52 days. The town has now dropped to tenth places, with properties typically spending 61 days on the market.

“What the next few months holds for the property market will depend largely on stock levels. If stock levels remain low and demand continues to outstrip the volume of properties available, homes in desirable areas will continue to sell quickly and prices will remain at their current levels or even continue to rise, albeit at a slower pace. Should demand slow once furlough and the stamp duty holiday come to a complete stop, I would expect to see prices begin to level off and we may even experience a slight price correction.”

The median time on market for the whole of England and Wales is currently 77 days.

Danny Luke, Quick Move Now’s managing director, commented: “It’s no surprise that London dominates the list of areas with the longest typical time on market; the city’s property market woes have been well documented over the last 18 months. However, it is worth noting that even the area with the longest typical time on market – Mayfair – has seen the benefits of a nationwide uplift in the market over the last six months. In March of this year, Mayfair properties typically spent 272 days on the market. The current typical time on market has dropped to 261 days.

“Elsewhere, we continue to see the effects of strong demand and limited supply. The current typical time on market across the whole of England and Wales is the lowest August figure since 2007. However, time on market has increased slightly in some areas since the phased ending of the stamp duty holiday, which was to be expected. In March of this year, Rochester was in ‘top spot’ with a typical time on market of just 52 days. The town has now dropped to tenth places, with properties typically spending 61 days on the market.

“What the next few months holds for the property market will depend largely on stock levels. If stock levels remain low and demand continues to outstrip the volume of properties available, homes in desirable areas will continue to sell quickly and prices will remain at their current levels or even continue to rise, albeit at a slower pace. Should demand slow once furlough and the stamp duty holiday come to a complete stop, I would expect to see prices begin to level off and we may even experience a slight price correction.”

The median time on market for the whole of England and Wales is currently 77 days.

Danny Luke, Quick Move Now’s Managing Director, said, “It’s no surprise that London dominates the list of areas with the longest typical time on market; the city’s property market woes have been well documented over the last 18 months. However, it is worth noting that even the area with the longest typical time on market – Mayfair – has seen the benefits of a nationwide uplift in the market over the last six months. In March of this year, Mayfair properties typically spent 272 days on the market. The current typical time on market has dropped to 261 days.

“Elsewhere, we continue to see the effects of strong demand and limited supply. The current typical time on market across the whole of England and Wales is the lowest August figure since 2007. However, time on market has increased slightly in some areas since the phased ending of the stamp duty holiday, which was to be expected. In March of this year, Rochester was in ‘top spot’ with a typical time on market of just 52 days. The town has now dropped to tenth places, with properties typically spending 61 days on the market.

“What the next few months holds for the property market will depend largely on stock levels. If stock levels remain low and demand continues to outstrip the volume of properties available, homes in desirable areas will continue to sell quickly and prices will remain at their current levels or even continue to rise, albeit at a slower pace. Should demand slow once furlough and the stamp duty holiday come to a complete stop, I would expect to see prices begin to level off and we may even experience a slight price correction.”